• Leopard

    SPECIES

    Leopard
    Panthera pardus
    IUCN
    NT

    Despite its ubiquitous distribution and large size, the leopard’s cryptic and solitary nature means it remains one of Africa’s most loved but least known large carnivores.
  • Leopard

    SPECIES

    Leopard
    Panthera pardus

    Leopards have disappeared from nearly 40% of their historical range in Africa. Tanzania is one of their last strongholds.
  • Leopard

    SPECIES

    Leopard
    Panthera pardus

    Leopards can live in broad range of habitat but are most successful in woodland, grassland savanna and forest.
  • Leopard

    SPECIES

    Leopard

    WCS studies leopards in the Southern Highlands, Udzungwa mountains and Tarangire.

  • Matilda's/ Horned Viper
  • Kipunji
  • Abbott's/ Duiker
  • Leopard
  • White- Backed/ Vulture
  • Elephant
  • Zanzibar Red/ Colobus
  • Cheetah
  • Humpback/ Dolphin

CONSERVATION SIGNIFICANCE CONSERVATION SIGNIFICANCE

Leopards can live in broad range of habitat but are most successful in woodland, grassland savanna and forest. However, they occur widely from coastal scrubby areas to high mountain ranges, as well as urban areas where they feed on domestic dogs. They also have diverse diets ranging from beetles and rodents to large ungulates.

Whilst leopards may be common or abundant in many protected areas and public lands with low human density, the species is increasingly uncommon across the continent. It is estimated that leopards have disappeared from nearly 40% of their historical range in Africa - including Zanzibar, where there have been no confirmed records since the 1990s. This trend is a concern given their dominant role in many ecosystems. Tanzania is one of their remaining African strongholds.

THREATS THREATS

Leopard numbers are declining in many areas due to habitat loss and fragmentation as well as hunting for trade and livestock defence. A rapidly increasing threat is also the poisoning of carcasses both specifically targeting carnivores, or as a side effect of veterinary drugs. The impact of the safari hunting industry on leopards is unknown although a CITES-approved quota of 500 per annum is approved each year.  Currently described by the IUCN Red List as ‘Near Threatened’ leopards may soon be reclassified as Vulnerable.

WCS APPROACH WCS APPROACH

Leopards are being studied by WCS in the Southern Highlands, the Udzungwa Mountains, and across the north of the country in order primarily to provide conservation management advice. Camera trapping and socioeconomic data are also collected in Zanzibar to ascertain finally if they still persist on Unguja.